moda vivendi

I'm just talking to myself. We do that sometimes, me and myself.


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Social media needs to be social

This was originally posted over at theBrewRoom blog.

Sometimes, it’s easy to forget that social media is, in fact, social.  Every time that certain car commercial comes on (you know, with the rep reading tweets and their hashtags), someone in the room with me asks, “What’s a hashtag?”  It’s a link to all the tweets in the world with said hashtag.  Then the inevitable, “But…..why?”  So you can see what people are saying (and jump into the conversation, of course)!  We’re so focused on using the Internet to throw information out into the universe that we forget the best way to use it; no one wants to be talked at, they want to converse.  Social media, and the marketing that goes with it, is virtual word of mouth.  It’s a conversation.  There are peoplBill Lumberghe constantly talking with and engaging other people.  If you want your business to be successful, you need to engage as well.

Let’s say I work somewhere like “Office Space.”  I have 3-5 on any given day asking me to tweet something, usually a promotion.  Of course, they all think  their message is the most important one to disseminate (so it must be posted NOW).  Well, when you overload people with text and they aren’t getting anything meaningful out of it, guess what will happen to your message? It’ll get tuned out (or they’ll just unfollow you period).  Now, when Lumbergh comes back 5 minutes later to ask if anyone is talking about it, he’ll be let down because the answer is no.

Long story short: be social.  Show you care about the community that you’ve built:

  • Ask questions.
  • Answer questions.
  • Include comments when you retweet whenever possible.
  • If you need to promote services or events, do it in a way that’s natural and not pushy.
  • Mention people to get the conversation going if you have a piece of information that you think is of interest to them (just don’t be spammy; no one likes that).

And don’t forget to “listen” to the conversations.  It’s a two-way flow of information.  Don’t expect to get a response if you are not responding yourself.


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Should Your Business Use Tumblr?

**Please note: I originally posted this on theBrewRoom blog. Head over there to see it in all its glory!

What happened to Tumblr?  It has a couple hundred (million) users, but even then, it seems like it was almost a flash in the pan.  According to WSJ, Tumblr was recently purchased by Yahoo to bring a social networking presence to the company that is mostly used by an older customer base.  A Google Trends search makes it pretty clear that it’s the forgotten middle child of social media.  (Does anyone else appreciate the irony of using Google to report on something Yahoo-related?  Fickle internet..)  So even though it’s hovering in the shadows for now, should your business use Tumblr?

Tumblr’s users are in a younger demographic.  If you’re Newsweek Tumblrmarketing to that younger crowd, this could be a great tool.  But even if you aren’t marketing to a younger crowd, you can utilize Tumblr in an effective way.  Most notably, if you have highly sharable, visually appealing content or snippets of interesting text.  Newsweek, among others, does a great job of this.

It is primarily a visual platform; if you have pictures to share, this is great.  So why not use Facebook or Instagram?  Well, my friends, you can cross-post.  And you can reach more people than just those who follow you.  If someone likes your content, they can “reblog” or share it on their own Tumblr page, and so on and so forth.  So how is it different than Facebook?  You can tag your pictures, similar to Instagram, and let the viral nature of Tumblr do its job.

Sure, you can use this as your sole website for your business, but I like to think of Tumblr as an extension of your brand identity.  The users are a little edgier, a little more tongue-in-cheek, a lot more visual, and therefore more likely to share things they find visually appealing on Tumblr.

The simplicity of this platform is also appealing and so is the ability to curate content.  But to see my full thoughts on that, head over to theBrewRoom (you know you want to)!


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Five Things: My Social Media Marketing Essentials

This week’s Five Things, I bring you my five social media marketing essentials that I can’t live without.  I’m sure you already use them, but if you don’t, look into it (or ask me to do it for you!)  This is by no means a complete list of every tool I use, just the ones I use daily.

1. TweetDeck – Oh how I love TweetDeck.  It is my go-to dashboard for Twitter.  It’s a seamless extension of the Twitter site.  Want to know every time someone checks into your business through Yelp?  Type in the keyword search “[your business] yelp” and it’ll automatically populate a list for you.  Tracking a hashtag campaign?  Type it in.  Yes, HootSuite offers this as well, along with their own great offerings like built-in analytics, but I prefer TweetDeck to manage multiple Twitter accounts for it’s ease-of-use and clean styling.

HootSuite2. HootSuite – Of course, HootSuite made it on this list.  As I mentioned, HootSuite does offer their own analytic reports for use about every social channel they support (we’re talking all the big players here), integration with Google Analytics, URL click stats, and the ability to make custom reports from their data.  While that’s all mighty fine and dandy, tend not to use HootSuite for tracking but for managing channels, like the five Facebook pages I work with every day.  Any more than that, though, and you’ll have to get a paid account.

3. Commun.it – A clean follower list is a happy follower list.  You can get that with Commun.it.  A basic (aka free) plan will be sufficient; upgrading to pro is just more of a good thing.  Commun.it allows you to see who has engaged with you the most, whom you need to respond to, and suggests who you should follow and/or unfollow based on recent interactions.  On the basic account, you can also track up to three keywords, similar to TweetDeck’s search function, but shows you “top influencers,” or people who use those keywords the most.  It will also suggest that you engage with a particular user based on their use of/relation to your keywords.  It’s a fascinating tool and I’m only scratching the surface.

4. Google Analytics – Yep, Google Analytics is making an appearance on here.  From learning which page your customers are Google Analyticslanding on to creating custom dashboards brimming with just about any metric you’d want to look at, this program will you just about anything you’d like to know about your website traffic.  I’m a particular fan of Visitors Flow.  It tells you on which page people begin, where they go from there, if they drop off, and the percent of each.  As well, you can filter which segment you want to analyze.  Want to know where people go after they come to your site from Facebook?  Segment for “Social.”  Not sure if you keywords are performing?  Boom, set for keywords.  Again, I’m only scratching the surface.

5. Bit.ly / Delivr I use bitly to shorten and track websites that I share with social channels.  I use Delivr to create QR codes (are QR codes over? Yeah, probably, but some people still like to use them for convenience).  Both will show you how many clicks you get, when, and where.  Bitly will tell you who else shared a bitly link to that content.  It will also show you clicks on that link versus clicks on your other links; this is helpful if you’re testing click rates.

Honorable mention to Twimbow because it’s cool.  It’ll organize your Twitter account based on color.  One color for DMs, one color for mentions, etc.

So that’s my short list of things I “reach for” (“click for”?) every day.  What can’t you live without?